Structure

Advice and thoughts on story structure.

Turning Points Propel Your Story

Turning points are why scenes exist. So it’s essential to understand how and why they work within your story to propel both plot and character.

The Case for Pantsing

Writing “by the seat of your pants,” aka “discovery writing” works better for some writers than outlining does. Read about the rationale for pantsing here.

Irony is Central to Storytelling

Irony is more important to storytelling than you might think. It helps create more poignant story events and ushers in more meaningful character transformation.

Your Writing Needs to Be Better Than Game of Thrones

The writing for the TV series has been in a steep downhill descent for a while, and the 3rd episode of Season 8, which needed to pay off a years-long plot arc, utterly failed to create a cohesive narrative.

Use “Urgent Story Questions” to Create Tension

Sometimes, the main source of tension in a story comes from a lingereing “urgent story question” that nags at the reader. You should be conscious of your story’s USQs so that you can make the most of them and create a more gripping story.

Use Beats to Move Characters within Scenes

Great insights on scene craft here! Learn to use beats within scenes to move characters.

How do you create a dynamic, consequential scene–one that actually moves the character? You use beats within the scene to create disturbances and shifts. This analysis can help your revision; it’s all about bringing character arc to the scene level.

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